ST. CLARE STATUEST. CLARE STATUE

ST. CLARE STATUE

$ 27.95

Patron Saint of television, eyes, good weather.
Feast Day: August 11.

Only 1 left in stock (can be backordered)

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SKU: 35111CLARE Categories: , , Tags: ,

Description

This 3 1/2″ tall pewter figurine is finely detailed, from the physical features, and the folds of the garments to the accessories that tradition commonly associates with this saint. Last but not least the saint’s name is inscribed on the base of this sturdy little statue.

About St. Clare . . .First, why did Pope Pius XII choose a thirteenth century woman dedicated to poverty (so she wouldn’t have owned a TV even if there was such a thing then) as the patron saint of television? The answer: because St. Clare, way back in the 1200s, was the first to experience “televised” Masses. That is, when she was too ill to attend the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, the Holy Spirit would project the Holy Mass on the wall of her room so that she could watch it from her bed!

Clare was a beautiful Italian noblewoman who became the Foundress of an order of nuns now known as the Poor Clares after hearing St. Francis of Assisi preach. Because of her desire to imitate Francis and to live a poor humble life for Jesus she ran away from home, and in a little chapel outside Assisi, gave herself to God. St. Francis cut off her hair and gave her a rough brown habit to wear, tied with a plain cord around her waist. Her parents tried in every way to make her return home, but Clare would not. Soon her sister, St. Agnes joined her, as well as other young women who wanted to be brides of Jesus, and live without any money. St. Clare and her sisters wore no shoes, ate no meat, lived in a poor house, and kept silent most of the time. Yet they were very happy, because Our Lord was close to them all the time. St. Clare was sick and suffered great pains for many years, but she said that no pain could trouble her. So great was her joy in serving the Lord that she once exclaimed: “They say that we are too poor, but can a heart which possesses the infinite God be truly called poor?”

Additional information

Weight .25 oz
Dimensions 5 x 2 x 2 in